Thumbi Mwangi, PhD

Thumbi Mwangi, PhD

Harnessing mathematical modelling to support rabies elimination efforts in Africa

Friday 2 June, 14:00, AIMS Main Lecture Hall

Abstract: Every year, rabies kills an estimated 24,000 people in Africa. The domestic dog is the main reservoir of the rabies virus and source of infection for more 99% of human cases. Despite the existence of effective vaccines for rabies in humans and in dogs, disease epidemiology that supports feasibility of elimination, rabies continues to be endemic in most of Africa. Using data from the rabies elimination program in Kenya and projects in Africa, we examine how mathematical models can be used to determine impact of policies on delivery of interventions of dog vaccines, human vaccines, dog population control on time to elimination, and cost implications.

About: Thumbi Mwangi is a Wellcome Trust fellow at the Center for Global Health Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute, a clinical assistant professor at the Paul G Allen School for Global Animal Health, Washington State University. His research is on linkages between human and animal health, focusing on surveillance, burden estimation, transmission dynamics, and control of zoonotic infectious diseases – including leading implementation research for rabies elimination in Kenya. He received his doctoral training in infectious disease epidemiology from the University of Edinburgh, Masters of Science and Veterinary Medicine and Surgery degrees from the University of Nairobi, Kenya.